C-Sick

Yesterday, my assigned nurse at the Chemo Day Unit confirmed that my blood test results were fine and dandy. I was duly packed off with five days’ worth of Temo the Chemo to start my third cycle. I took the tablets around 4pm, along with an anti-sickness tablet. As I mentioned in a previous post, for those not paying attention, I have to take the Temo at least two hours after food and two hours before food.

I felt fine and had my tea at around 6.15pm. It was lamb and roasted veg, nothing unusual. I felt soon after that it had not quite settled in my stomach and then felt a bit nauseous. Less than an hour later, Jennifer chose Mr Greedy for a bedtime story Continue reading “C-Sick”

The Fruity Potato

I’ve seen the meme below a number of times:

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The first time I saw it, I laughed out loud because I identified with it immediately. It captured my tiredness during a particularly busy and stressful time at work when I was pregnant with Leo. I saw it again yesterday and it made me laugh again but it also made me think of the ongoing efforts of the Triumverate of carers and their increasing tiredness. I haven’t told Mr C that I’m thinking of giving him a new nickname: Continue reading “The Fruity Potato”

Turn On, Tune In, Cop Out

The Brain Tumour Charity’s research strategy, A Cure Can’t Wait, has the twin goals of doubling survival rates within ten years and halving the harm that brain tumours have on quality of life within five years. 

The Brain Tumour Charity asked a while ago if I would be willing to share my family’s brain tumour stories and last week sent a press release out to coincide with the beginning of Brain Tumour Awareness Month. They arranged two interviews, the first of which was with a journalist from Global News, Continue reading “Turn On, Tune In, Cop Out”

The Cran[ial] Kick

The Headsmart campaign for early diagnosis in children has raised awareness of the specific symptoms of brain tumours to look out for in babies, children and teens. It has helped to reduce the average diagnosis time for children from 13 weeks to 6.5 weeks. The campaign is being relaunched in a bid to reduce this further to 4 weeks.

I missed an opportunity in my previous post to help you visualise the upwards leg- and foot-lift start to seizures that I tried to describe. I am someone who (proudly) knows the meaning of “wax on, wax off” Continue reading “The Cran[ial] Kick”

Two Steps Forward, Eight Kicks Upwards

There are many symptoms for brain tumours in adults (see here), most (if not all) of which are symptoms for other ailments too. As brain tumours are relatively rare, with around 10,600 people in the UK diagnosed each year, happily, most of the time the symptoms will not be due to a brain tumour but please make yourself aware of them to get checked out if necessary!

Today, as I mentioned in my last post, Continue reading “Two Steps Forward, Eight Kicks Upwards”

All Cancers are Equal, but Some Cancers are More Equal than Others

Brain tumours are the biggest cancer killer of children and people under 40 in the UK.

Six months ago today I collapsed at home and the Squatter was discovered. Today also marks the beginning of Brain Tumour Awareness Month (BTAM) in the UK. Unless you’ve stumbled across this page accidentally and haven’t heard of a brain tumour before, you might be thinking “well, duh, I’m already aware of brain tumours Continue reading “All Cancers are Equal, but Some Cancers are More Equal than Others”

A Ton of Post[s] but no Telegram from the Queen

This is the hundredth post of this blog.

Today is the 170th day that I have known that the Squatter is inside my head. Therefore, on average, a post has been uploaded every 41 hours or so by me or one of my surrogates. That’s not too shabby a run-rate considering that Continue reading “A Ton of Post[s] but no Telegram from the Queen”